RESEARCH ARTICLE


Radiological Pitfalls in Patients with Inducible Dynamic Proptosis



Sharon R Morris 1, Jean-Louis DeSousa1, Ian Francis 2, Lekha Chandrasekharan2, Raman Malhotra1, *
1 Corneoplastic Unit, Queen Victoria Hospital, Holtye Road, East Grinstead, West Sussex RH19 3DZ, UK
2 Department of Radiology, Queen Victoria Hospital, Holtye Road, East Grinstead, West Sussex RH19 3DZ, UK


© Morris et al. ; Licensee Bentham Open

open-access license: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5/), which permits unrestrictive use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

* Address correspondence to this author at the Corneoplastic Unit, Queen Victoria Hospital, Holtye Road, East Grinstead, West Sussex RH19 3DZ, UK; Tel: +44 (0) 1342 414549; Fax: +44 (0) 1342 414106; E-mail: raman.malhotra@qvh.nhs.uk


Abstract

We report two patients presenting with marked clinical unilateral enophthalmos who had positional variability and dynamic proptosis on valsalva. On orbital imaging, enophthalmos was not documented and in fact, globe proptosis of the same side was reported for one of the patients. During CT and MRI scanning patients are often instructed to hold their breath to eliminate motion artefact. This may inadvertently induce dynamic proptosis. The radiological pitfalls of imaging patients with inducible dynamic proptosis and how to identify such patients are discussed.

Keywords: CT, MRI, dynamic, proptosis, valsalva.