RESEARCH ARTICLE


HIV and HBsAg Seropositivity Amongst Patients Presenting for Ocular Surgery at a Tertiary Eye Care Hospital in Nigeria



M B Alhassan*, P Unung , GO Adejor
National Eye Centre, PMB 2267, Western ByePass, Kaduna, Nigeria


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© Alhassan et al.; Licensee Bentham Open.

open-access license: This is an open access article licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the work is properly cited.

* Address correspondence to this author at the National Eye Centre, PMB 2267, Kaduna, 8000001, Nigeria; Tel: 234 8035899559; E-mail: mabalhassan@gmail.com


Abstract

Background:

The prevalence of HIV/AIDS and HBsAg sero-positivity is very high in sub-Saharan African. There is a risk of horizontal transmission of these diseases amongst ophthalmic patients.

Aim:

To determine the proportion patients for eye surgery who are HIV/AIDS and HBsAg sero-positive at the National Eye Centre, Kaduna, Nigeria.

Methods:

Patients selected for eye surgery during a surgical camp at the National Eye Centre, Kaduna were counseled for Voluntary Counseling and Testing (VCT) and HBsAg to determine their viral status.

Results:

A total of 650 patients who were selected were screened. The distributions of the indications for selection were as follows: cataract 483 (74.3%); glaucoma 44 (6.8%) and pterygium 123 (18.9%). Two patients (0.2%) were found to be HIV seropositive while 11 (1.5%) were HbsAg positive.

Conclusion:

Pre-operative screening of all patients going for ophthalmic surgery for HIV and HbsAg may be desirable in our environment.

Keywords: HIV, HBsAg, ocular surgery, seroprevalence, Nigeria.